The Many Benefits of Reading – Penguin Random House

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The Many Benefits of Reading – Penguin Random House

Cognitive:

Improves Memory: Reading activates the parts of your brain that create new synapses for memory.

Lengthens Life: One study shows that those who read as little as 30 minutes a day live on average 2 years longer than non-readers.

Makes You Smarter: Reading has been shown to enhance vocabulary, improve articulation, and increase creativity.

 

Physical:

Relieves Stress & Lowers Blood Pressure: Just 6 minutes of reading has been shown to lower heart rate and muscle tension.

Improves Sleep: Incorporating a reading routine into your bedtime ritual tells your body it’s time to wind down and get some sleep.

 

Emotional:

Makes You More Empathetic: Reading literary fiction, in particular, has been shown to improve one’s understanding of others’ beliefs and views.

 

Do something for your health and happiness by reading more!

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Book Giveaway – Brave Souls: Experiencing the Audacious Power of Empathy – InterVarsity Press

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Enter for a chance to win 1 of 20 advance copies of Brave Souls by Belinda Bauman!

Goodreads entry link can be found HERE

Book Description: What if empathy could save us? From the top of Mount Kilimanjaro to the borders of war-torn Syria, Belinda Bauman takes readers along her journey to empathy. With cutting-edge neuroscience, biblical parables, and stories of brave women from across the globe, she casts a vision for lives and communities transformed by everyday Christians practicing empathy as a spiritual discipline.

Giveaway ends on January 16th, 2019.

Why Reading Books Should Be Your Priority, According to Science | Inc.com

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More than a quarter–26 percent–of American adults admit to not having read even part of a book within the past year. That’s according to statistics coming out of the Pew Research Center. If you’re part of this group, know that science supports the idea that reading is good for you on several levels.

Reading fiction can help you be more open-minded and creative

According to research conducted at the University of Toronto, study participants who read short-story fiction experienced far less need for “cognitive closure” compared with counterparts who read nonfiction essays. Essentially, they tested as more open-minded, compared with the readers of essays. “Although nonfiction reading allows students to learn the subject matter, it may not always help them in thinking about it,” the authors write. “A physician may have an encyclopedic knowledge of his or her subject, but this may not prevent the physician from seizing and freezing on a diagnosis when additional symptoms point to a different malady.”

People who read books live longer

That’s according to Yale researchers who studied 3,635 people older than 50 and found that those who read books for 30 minutes daily lived an average of 23 months longer than nonreaders or magazine readers. Apparently, the practice of reading books creates cognitive engagement that improves lots of things, including vocabulary, thinking skills, and concentration. It also can affect empathy, social perception, and emotional intelligence, the sum of which helps people stay on the planet longer.

Reading 50 books a year is something you can actually accomplish

While about a book a week might sound daunting, it’s probably doable by even the busiest of people. Writer Stephanie Huston says her thinking that she didn’t have enough time turned out to be a lame excuse. Now that she has made a goal to read 50 books in a year, she says that she has traded wasted time on her phone for flipping pages in bed, on trains, during meal breaks, and while waiting in line. Two months into her challenge, she reports having more peace and satisfaction and improved sleep, while learning more than she thought possible.

Successful people are readers

It’s because high achievers are keen on self-improvement. Hundreds of successful executives have shared with me the books that have helped them get where they are today.

https://www.inc.com/christina-desmarais/why-reading-books-should-be-your-priority-according-to-science.html

Diverse Theologians to Read in 2019

Thabiti Anyabwile writes:

Recently a brother on Twitter asked if I could recommend some orthodox theologians from around the world that he could read in 2019. It’s not the first time I’ve gotten such a request. So I thought I’d put together a short list of theologians and leaders from differing ethnic backgrounds for those who may be interested to diversify their reading lists.

But first, a couple of words about the list:

It’s clearly not an exhaustive list. Think of it as some places to start and feel free to add others in the comment section if you like.

Also, since the brother on Twitter specifically asked about things to read, I’ve not included a ton of preachers who would be good to consult but limited the list to folks who have written for the church.

I did not include people that are likely to be well-known already by TGC readers.
While I don’t know everyone listed here or their body of work, I’ve tried to list folks I believe to be orthodox.

Finally, I didn’t do all the work for you. I’ve given you names, you’ll have to chase down some of their excellent work yourself 🙂

If you’re interested in a longer list of resources including some works outside of orthodoxy, you can try lists here and here.
American

Soong-Chan Rah (Korean-American)

Richard Twiss (Native American)

Mark Charles (Native American)

Edwin M. Yamauchi (Japanese-American)

Nikki Toyama-Szeto (Asian American)
Latin American/Hispanic

Rene Padilla (Ecuador)

Ruth Padilla DeBorst (Ecuador)
Asian

Ajith Fernando (Sri Lanka)

Bob Fu (China)

Nijay Gupta (India)

Barbara M. Leung Lai (Chinese-Canadian)

K. K. Yep (Malaysia)

Abraham George (India)
African

Femi B. Adelewe (Nigeria)

J. Ayodeji Adewuya (Nigeria)

Daniel K. Darko (Ghana)

Conrad Mbewe (Zambia)
Caribbean

Osvaldo Padilla (Dominican Republic)

Hensworth Jonas (Antigua and Barbuda)
Middle East

Chawkat Moucarry (Born in Syria, lives in France)

https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/thabiti-anyabwile/diverse-theologians-read-2019/

Book Review: David A. deSilva, The Letter to the Galatians (NICNT)

Reading Acts

deSilva, David A. The Letter to the Galatians. NICNT; Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2018. lxxix+541 pp.; Hb.; $55.00. Link to Eerdmans

Over the past few years Eerdmans has been replacing older volumes of the New International Commentary on the New Testament. In the case of Galatians, deSilva’s new commentary replaces Ronald Y. K. Fung’s 1988 commentary, itself a replacement of Herman Ridderbos’s 1953 work originally written in Dutch. Each generation of the commentary has grown, from Ridderbos’s 238 pages to Fung’s 342 pages, now deSilva’s 541 pages (plus 76 pages of bibliography). The new NICNT volumes are also larger size volume (6×9 as opposed to 5×7, Ridderbos has a larger font than the other two). Ridderbos had a thirty-eight page introduction, a half page subject index and no bibliography; deSilva’s introduction runs one hundred and eight pages, twenty-three pages of indices and fifty-one pages of bibliography.

deSilva, The Letter to the GalatiansWhat has happened…

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