2019 IVP Reader’s Choice Awards – Finalist Voting Now Open

rca-2019.jpg

2019 IVP Readers’ Choice Awards
Vote for Your Favorite IVP Books of 2019!

Between November 2018 and December 2019, IVP published more than 130 new titles. It’s that time of year for their 6th annual Readers’ Choice Awards!

Nomination voting is over, but now IVP is happy to announce their 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards finalists and it’s time for you to choose the winners!

VOTE FOR THE FINALISTS HERE

Voting will close on Friday, February 7 at 12:00 PM CT.

John M.G. Barclay’s New Grace Book —Coming Nov 2020

Crux Sola

In 2015, Prof. John Barclay wrote Paul and the Gift (Eerdmans), an important monograph that rocked Pauline studies and has widely been hailed the most important book on Paul in the last two decades.

In 2020, Barclay will publish another book on the theme of grace. From what I can gather, this book revisits and summarizes his key arguments (it is much shorter than PatG), and Barclay engages with the critical feedback he has received in the last few years. If you read Paul and the Gift, you will be interested in the way Barclay responds to the ongoing conversation about Pauline theology. If you did not read Paul and the Gift, this book will serve as a nice condensed summary (it would seem).

The title of the new book is Paul and the Power of Grace (Eerdmans, Nov 2020).

PPG

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2019 IVP Reader’s Choice Awards

rca-2019.jpg

2019 IVP Readers’ Choice Awards
Nominate Your Favorite IVP Books of 2019!

Between November 2018 and December 2019, IVP published more than 130 new titles. They need your help to select the fan favorites for their 6th annual Readers’ Choice Awards!

VOTE HERE

The deadline to nominate is Friday, January 24 at 12:00 pm.

The finalists will be selected and voting will be live on Monday, January 27!

Christmas: a bad ritual?

Dru Johnson

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(An excerpt fromHuman Rites: The Power of Rituals, Habits, and Sacraments, ch. 9 “Riting Our Wrongs”)

“We know that all Christians in the early church celebrated Easter, and that Jesus commanded us to celebrate other rituals like the Lord’s Supper. But the birth of Jesus was not celebrated—either by Jesus or his apostles. And we read about Jesus’s birth in only two of the four Gospels. Still, we celebrate the birth of Jesus every year.

But are we really doing that—or have the commercial attractions of Christmas completely overtaken our remembrance of Christ? We should give some careful thought to our Christmas rituals and what effect they have on us. What might we be able to do to change this?

We all know of the Christmas gift rituals that powerfully overtake a child’s entire being year after year. And how about the Santa Claus myth?

I couldn’t…

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Gospel Allegiance: What Faith in Jesus Misses for Salvation in Christ by Matthew W. Bates – Book Review

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Gospel Allegiance: What Faith in Jesus Misses for Salvation in Christ

Wow! Coming off his last book, Salvation by Allegiance Alone, Matthew W. Bates dives right back into the subject with momentum and augmented detail.

The specific focus found in Gospel Allegiance: What Faith in Jesus Misses for Salvation in Christ breaks down the walls, barriers, and misunderstandings behind centuries of gospel definitions and misinterpretations.

Bates has no trouble getting straight to the point, comparing Scripture to the teachings of some well-known theologians, and clearing the clutter from erroneous tradition.

This is a must-read for pastors, lay-people, and anyone who wants to gain a better understanding of what “believing” in Christ Jesus truly means. You’ll walk away motivated, challenged, and with a refreshed outlook which will help grow your allegiance toward King Jesus.

Highly recommended!

Check it out on Amazon and Christianbook

Reading Revelation in Context: Quick Look (Gupta)

Crux Sola

My friends Ben Blackwell, John Goodrich, and Jason Maston have been editing a great series in the last few years: Reading Romans in Context, Reading Mark in Context, and now—Reading Revelation in Context. I was honored to contribute to the first two volumes (Romans, Mark), and so I have first hand knowledge of how helpful these books are.

But I will say—now that I have been able to peruse the Revelation volume—that this seems to me to be the most important of the three. Why? Because Mark and Romans make a lot of sense on their own, by just reading the text and following the story or argument. Yes, of course “reading in context” is helpful, highly insightful, and makes for an overall more accurate and satisfying reading. When it comes to Revelation—to be honest, most of us (including myself) just flip through the pages looking for 

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